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It’s that time of the year again .Delicious mangos with the goodness of Vitamins.So here the season has started . Enjoy the king of fruits which is garnished on the lovely layered cake from Chococherri.

A write up about Mangos:

Our country is very rich in fruits. They are of many kinds, shapes and sizes. They also have different smells, tastes and colours.The Mango is the national fruit. It has been cultivated in India since time immemorial. There are over 100 varieties of mangos in India, in a range of colors, sizes, and shapes.Common in the tropical part of the world, mangos are savored for their sweet juice and bright colors.People in India eat mangos ripe, or prepare them green as pickles or chutneys. They are rich in vitamin A, C, and D. The poet Kalidasa sang its praises.

Alexander the great savoured its taste, as did the Chinese pilgrim Hieun Tsang. Akbar planted 100,000 mango trees in Darbhanga, known as Lakhibagh.

Types of Mangoes in India:

Safeda/ Banganapalli

Mango Tango Festival In Patna

This is one of the earliest varieties of mangoes to hit the market. Originally from Andhra Pradesh, Safeda has found widespread acceptance across the country. The skin has a lovely bright yellow hue and the taste is slightly sour. These mangoes are quite fibreless.

Pairi

Mango Tango Festival In Patna

With Safeda, Pairi also is an early entrant in the markets. The skin’s reddish tinge is a dead giveaway and when I went to buy some, the fruit seller told me “Go on, buy them in lots. These are not mangoes, they’re pure honey”. Though not sickly sweet, pairi has a noticeable sour bite hidden somewhere in that deliciousness. If Kesar is not available, Pairi is used to make aamras in Gujarat. Keeping quality is not great so consume them quickly post purchase.

Neelam

Mango Tango Festival In Patna

Noticeable with its distinctive lovely fragrance, Neelam is available throughout the season but the tastiest ones come in only by June with the monsoons. These mangoes are a favourite in Hyderabad, though they are produced all over the country. They are tiny in comparison to other varieties and have orange skin.

Alphonso/ Hapus

Mango Tango Festival In Patna 

There is a good chance you have heard of the small spherical Alphonso mangoes, and perhaps even believe it to be the ‘king of mangoes’ which is how it is marketed. Native to Maharashtra, it is also grown in Gujarat and parts of Karnataka and Madhya Pradesh. This is perhaps the most expensive variety of Indian mangoes and is exported in plenty. Whether it is the tastiest of them all, is something that the jury is still out on.

Himsagar

Mango Tango Festival In Patna

Perhaps the shortest lived season amongst all. Bengalis know their sweets so when they swear by Himsagar mangoes, it’s wise to sit up and take notice. Fiber-less and fleshy, these yellow mangoes are great in milkshakes too. The season lasts all of four weeks so don’t wait too long.

Dussehri

Mango Tango Festival In Patna

Lovingly called ‘chusne wala aam’ by children, this one is best enjoyed by tearing off the tip and sucking out the sweet pulp and juice. You can soften the mango by pressing it lightly with your fingertips beforehand. Popular in its homeland, Uttar Pradesh, a typical village scene involves a bucket full of Dussehri aam, kids sitting around it and indulging in them till the bucket is empty. Arguably one of the oldest mango variety in the country, Dussehri traces its roots back to the Nawab of Lucknow’s gardens in the 18th century. Today, they come from the Malihabad belt, 30km from Lucknow.

Totapuri

Mango Tango Festival In Patna

These mangoes are the easiest to identify, due to the shape with the tip looking like a parrot’s beak. Totapuri hails from Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, Telangana and Tamil Nadu. The flesh is not sweet like the other mango varieties but is great for salads or with a tempering of salt and chilies. It is used as an ingredient for many mass-produced mango products in India.

Kesar

Mango Tango Festival In Patna

If your house is filled with the fragrance of mango, there’s a good chance you have Kesar aam in the kitchen. Its smell is its most distinguishing feature, the colour of the pulp resembling saffron, the spice it is named after. The skin is greener than most other mangoes. Grown in and around Ahmedabad, Gujarat, these are used primarily to make aamras in Gujarat (Maharashtrians prefer theirs made with Hapus).

Chausa

Mango Tango Festival In Patna

Just when you think the mango season is coming to an end, Chausa floods the market and there joy in the world again. Popular in North India and Bihar, these mangoes have incredibly sweet pulp and bright yellow skin. The best ones come from Pakistan and are exported across the world.

Langra

Mango Tango Festival In Patna

It is a mystery to many why this mango is called Langra (literally meaning a disabled person who can’t walk well). The mother tree for this variety still grows in Varanasi, whose owner was unfortunately lame, which is where the mango got its name. But nomenclature aside, this fibrous mango finds great popularity in West Bengal as well as Haryana, Uttar Pradesh and Bihar.

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